Ned Vizzini, ‘Teen Wolf’ YA Creator And Writer, Dead At 32 - Music, Celebrity, Artist News





In addition to penning scripts for MTV’s “Teen Wolf,” Vizzini was also a popular young adult author, having published his standout book, “It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” in 2006. The novel — with was partly autobiographical — was about a teen who attempts suicide and ends up in a mental hospital. It was turned into a movie starring Zach Galifianakis in 2010.


Location: 1816 Patrick St.,
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Vizzini was a voice for the younger set before publishing a full novel, however, writing essays for the likes of the New York Times Magazine as a teen.

Over the course of his career, Vizzini penned several books — “Be More Chill,” “Teen Angst? Naah,” “The Other Normals” — and was co-writing a series with director Chris Columbus, the first book of which, “House of Secrets,” came out this year. Vizzini also contributed to TV shows like “The Last Resort” and “Believe.”

MTV issued a statement in wake of the news, writing “We are deeply saddened by this terrible news. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family during this difficult time.”

Fellow writers and friends have been taking to Twitter to honor the life and memory of the author. YA writer Libba Bray said, “So sad to hear the heartbreaking news about Ned Vizzini. He was a funny, honest writer who gave a lot to the NYC community. He’ll be missed,” while fans like Kelsey McKinney expressed her gratitude for his work: “Ned Vizzini was the voice I needed as a young teenager. Source:
www.dumpsters4cheap.net/florida/dumpster-rental-in-kissimmee-fl/ . His death is a huge loss.”

Most remembrances were personal and thankful, expressing gratitude for the effect Vizzini’s work had on fans’ lives. “Sad to hear about the passing of one of my favorite authors today,” tweeted Jacob Paul. “He was a great author and inspired me to get help.”

Original: http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1719505/ned-vizzini-dead.jhtml

Exclusive deep water port is going to be built in Crimea utilizing Asian buyers’ funds

Source: http://en.interfax.com.ua/news/economic/179545.html



An Interfax-Ukraine correspondent has reported that the relevant memorandum was signed by Kyivhydroinvest and China’s BICIM as a part of the Ukrainian-Chinese business forum in Beijing on Thursday.



“This is a unique facility, which will have the function of redistributing freight flows from the east to Europe,” Maziuk told reporters.

He said that Ukraine is located on the Eurasian transport corridor, historically named the Silk Road.

“Today, we’re participating in the restoration of the route with elements of marine logistics,” he added.

“The project will be realized in a public private partnership regime, which is clearly regulated by our laws. Finally, the state receive ownership of half of the facilities that will be built,” Maziuk said.

He said that this is a first precedent of realizing a large-scale infrastructure project in Ukraine using money of investors and not secured by the state.

He said that the project foresees the building of several terminals and grain elevators with a capacity of 20 million tonnes. Related businesses:
San Jose temporary power rental . Maziuk said that the port’s water area will be dug using unique solutions and it will allow the servicing of large ocean-going ships with deep drafts.

He said that the decision to start the realization of the project was made a month ago, and work will be started next year. The approximate cost of the construction of the first stage of the project is $3 billion.

“The first phase will be realized in some four or five years,” he said.

“Taking into account the fact that the projected capacity of the port is from 140 million tonnes a year, one could calculate that the port and other duties alone will bring in at least $1.5 billion a year to the state,” he said.



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He added that goods from Asia to Europe and back would go via the port.

Ask Factcheck: Free fuel For low income Americans?

Url: http://www.philly.com/philly/news/breaking/Factcheck_Free_gas_For_low_income_Americans.html

Question: Is there a provision in the Affordable Healthcare Act that sets up gas stations to provide free gas to minorities and the poor?

Answer: Let’s quickly dispense with this rumor, which has been making the rounds on the Internet. It originated in an  on a humor site, The Daily Currant:

According to a report in The Detroit News this morning, the [Obama] administration is using its authority under the Affordable Care Act to “improve transportation routes to hospitals” to dispense gasoline free of cost in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

The $2 billion-a-year program aims to distribute 40 million gallons of free gasoline each year through 70 new gas stations constructed in major metropolitan areas. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHS) will be responsible for operating the network, whose first station opened yesterday in Detroit.

“Supposedly access to the station is determined by income,” says Ebony Jackson, manager of the first Obamastation. “But it’s pretty unrealistic to do an income check on each and every driver. So what we do is basically let all the black people pump for free, and charge all the white people the market rate.”

However, this is satire, not real news. The site’s  reads:

The Daily Currant is an English language online satirical newspaper that covers global politics, business, technology, entertainment, science, health and media. It is accessible from over 190 countries worldwide – now including South Sudan.

Our mission is to ridicule the timid ignorance which obstructs our progress, and promote intelligence – which presses forward.





Place of business: 1783 Knotty Branch Trl,
Rock Hill, SC, 29730
Phone: 800-539-2590

Q. Are your news stories real?

A. No. Our stories are purely fictional. However they are meant to address real-world issues through satire and often refer and link to real events happening in the world.

Other stories on the site include “NASA Finds Message From God on Mars” and “Al Gore Claims He Invented Twitter.”

To be clear, there is nothing in the  that authorizes the government to dispense free gasoline to minorities or the poor. The law does, however, expand Medicaid to provide health services to more poor people, and it provides a sliding scale of subsidies for health insurance to people with annual incomes between 100 percent and 400 percent of the federal poverty level. But, alas, no free gas.

Here at FactCheck.org, we have written about satirical news stories many times in the past, and we get emails about new ones every week. As always, we advise readers to apply a healthy dose of skepticism to reports on the web, particularly from news sources that are unfamiliar. Here’s another tip: When you come across online news stories with outrageous claims, it is a good idea to check the site’s “About” page. Often, if the site is in the business of writing satire, it will say so there.

As a handy guide, here is a list of some of the satirical sites we’ve come across:

— Written by Andy Borowitz, a daily satire column for The New Yorker. Upon his move to The New Yorker, Borowitz  “The Borowitz Report will be as inaccurate as always, and if I ever write something that turns out to be true you have my deepest apology and my promise that it won’t happen again.”

— If the blog’s motto, “All the news that’s unfit to print,” doesn’t clue you in, some of the headlines should: “Obama Furious After Vladimir Putin Unfriends Him on Facebook” and “President Obama and North Korean Dictator Kim Jong-Un in Twitter Feud.”

— We  with these guys when they ran a story that said military absentee ballots that arrived a day late swung the election in favor of President Obama. “We are in no way, shape, or form, a real news outlet,” the site warns. It serves up “military humor, funny military pictures, and faux news.”

— It fancies itself a conservative/libertarian alternative to the Onion.

— We’re not sure why anyone would take seriously a report from a website whose motto is “News That’s Almost Reliable.” This site serves up satire with a left-leaning bent, as evidenced by headlines such as “Louie Gohmert: ‘Healthcare.gov Smiling Woman Taken Out By Death Panel,’” and “Sarah Palin: ‘Thanksgiving is for Real Americans Not Indians.’”

— Sometimes, satirical sites even fool the media, with embarrassing results. Such was the case when Fox News host Anna Kooiman  a story from National Report that claimed President Obama personally funded the International Museum of Muslim Cultures. 

– Newslo describes itself as “the first hybrid News/Satire platform on the web.” It provides its readers with a “fact-button” on stories containing satire. It also marks stories that are completely true with “#NNTS,” which stands for “No Need To Satirize.”

— Plenty of media outlets have mistaken satirical Onion articles for the truth. One of our favorites was when the website of China’s state paper, People’s Daily Online, noted that the Onion   North Korea’s Kim Jong-un as the “Sexiest Man Alive”  in 2012. Even the New York Times has fallen victim to the Onion’s satire. It had to run an explaining that Tiger Beat had not, in fact, run a cover with Obama appealing to “tween” voters — that it was a parody cover created by the Onion.

–  with Robert Farley

“.” The Daily Currant. 29 October 2013, accessed 21 November 2013.

“.” The Daily Currant. Accessed 21 November 2013.

. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. 111th Congress. Enacted 23 Mar 2010.

“.” The New Yorker. Accessed 21 November 2013.

Borowitz, Andy. “.” The New Yorker. 18 July 2013, accessed 22 November 2013.

“.” The Daily Rash. Accessed 21 November 2013.

“.” The Duffel Blog. Accessed 22 November 2013.

Farley, Robert. “” 9 November 2012, accessed 22 November 2013.

“.” Duh Progressive. Accessed 21 November 2013.

Free Wood Post (site currently undergoing maintenance)

“.” National Report. Accessed 21 November 2013.

“.” msnNow. 6 October 2013, accessed 22 November 2013.

“.” Newslo. Accessed 21 November 2013.




“.” The Onion. Accessed 21 November 2013.

“.” The Onion. 14 November 2012, accessed 22 November 2013.

“.” The New York Times. 16 April 2011, accessed 22 November 2013.